Author Archives: wpreston

PowerApps + SharePoint Drop Down Thoughts

This probably falls somewhere under app design, governance, and tips and tricks in the cross-over space between SharePoint and PowerApps.

When creating a list in SharePoint and needing a field with options in it, we need to decide between the relatively static ‘choice’ field with the options baked in to the control, and creating a Lookup control that pulls its options from another list. They both have their place. Choice fields tend to be a bit simpler while Lookups come with a little more overhead, but are good from a data perspective with consistency.

With the introduction of PowerApps and creating new design surfaces for your list data the Lookup option extends that consistency a bit further and may make you choose Lookups even more. When it comes to CRUD forms, both the Choice field and Lookup fields work great (way to go PowerApps and SharePoint teams!). Building other interfaces, however, may encourage SharePoint users to lean more on Lookups.

The Scenario

A default app created by the ‘Create an app’ option from SharePoint gives you a 3-page app that starts with a gallery view filtered by a Search control. I’d like to change the filtering of the page to be a drop down of a Status field. Two options we can use to accomplish this are to create a drop down with static options (like a the SharePoint Choice field) or to create a drop down connected to the same SharePoint list as the Lookup field.

image image

Option #1 – Static options

The initial reason I considered this was because I didn’t actually want to give users *all* of the options that are available in a choice field. Using a static options control allowed me to just display the options I wanted them to see. This is easily implemented using the method covered in my last post – Simple Drop Down Options – and using values that exactly match your list field values.

One possible upside to this approach is that you could use different text or drop down options that might make sense to users but *don’t* match your list values and then use formulas to match your drop down control values to your list values. For example in the above image I have a number attached to each option in my dropdown which some folks might prefer to leave off: “Paid” instead of “5 – Paid”.

The downside of this approach is I now have one more place where I’m required to maintain the list of values. If I update the Choice field in my SharePoint list I might also need to update the drop down control in PowerApps.

Option #2 – Lookup field options

This seems like how the drop down control was intended to be used. Rather than having to manually add values you can simply connect the control to an existing SharePoint list and have the exact same values as the SharePoint list column.

1. Add an additional data source to your PowerApp

2. Add the Drop Down control and set the Items value. By default it’s already set to a sample data set.
3. Change the Items property to the new data source and field to display and boom. Done.

4. Switch to the Advanced properties for the drop down control and set a default value for it.

5. Finally, change the gallery control to use the new drop down as a filter instead of the Search box (key change is highlighted).

From: SortByColumns(Filter(‘Sponsors 2018 April’, StartsWith(Company, TextSearchBox1_1.Text)), “Company”, If(SortDescending1, Descending, Ascending))

To: SortByColumns(Filter(‘Sponsors 2018 April’, (Dropdown1.Selected.Value = Status.Value)), “Company”, If(SortDescending1, Descending, Ascending))

NOTE: When using this approach It is important to understand how Delegation works with PowerApps and SharePoint in order to ensure complete and correct data is being surfaced in PowerApps. See references below for more information.

The most notable upside to this approach is that both the PowerApps drop down control and the SharePoint list column are pulling their options from the same data source and changes to that one list will update both the SharePoint list options AND the PowerApp.

Finally, as was mentioned in Option 1 – if you don’t want to make all the options available in the drop down control you can still accomplish this here by filtering the list like this:
Items = Filter(StatusOpts, StartsWith(Title,”2″) || StartsWith(Title,”3″) || StartsWith(Title,”4″) || StartsWith(Title,”5″))


The added benefits of using a separate list in SharePoint as a lookup source (Option #2 above) for SharePoint list data *and* PowerApps controls seems the better option for longer-term management.


PowerApps – Simple Drop Down Options

I’ll just file this under ‘recommended documentation updates’.
(Which I submitted on the corresponding page)

Playing around with some UX in PowerApps I wanted to add a drop down control with simple, static values in it and couldn’t find an example of how to do it on the Drop down control in PowerApps page where I’d expect to find it. What we’re talking about is the Items property and formula. After poking around a bit I found the example I needed in the Examples section of the List Box control page:


Yields the following:




Spring and More, Conferences Galore!

As SharePoint and Office 365 continue to evolve, the SharePoint community seems to be as strong as ever. There are a bunch of conferences coming up over the next few months. Here are a few notable ones:

March 2-3 – North American Collaboration Summit – Branson, MO
Better hurry up if you want to make this one. There are a ton of great speakers in town for this one as it’s just before the MVP Summit in Redmond. So catch these folks while you can. It is a great value for your time and a nice little escape from Winter for a few days.
FYI – It *is* drivable from the Twin Cities – we’ve done it a few times. Smile
Discount Code: COLLABSUMMIT50

March 26-30 – SharePoint Fest – Washington DC
A quality SharePoint, Office 365, Azure, and Microsoft Teams event offered several times a year between DC, Seattle (August), and Chicago (December). These folks do a great job. They’ve been doing this ‘series’ for a few years and they just seem to get better. They’ve recently switched to a longer 5-day format that includes 2 days of workshops and 3 days of sessions. Be sure to check them out. I’ll be doing a workshop and 3 sessions at the DC event.
Discount Code: PrestonDC100

April 7 – SharePoint Saturday Omaha – Omaha, NE

April 14th – SharePoint Saturday Twin Cities – Minneapolis, MN
Back for our Spring event with registration just opening up today.

May 5 – SharePoint Saturday Chicago Suburbs – Chicago, IL

May 21-23 – SharePoint Conference North America – Las Vegas, NV
Note: This is NOT a Microsoft-run event like previous ‘SPC’ events, but it IS Microsoft sponsored, backed, and endorsed. There will be a LOT of product group folks attending and speaking in addition to plenty of community-recognized experts, MVPs, etc.
Discount Code:

And of course there continue to be SharePoint Saturday (SPS) events throughout the US and the world. Please remember, not all SPS events are listed on the SPSEvents site – Including OURS – for a variety of reasons. So keep up to date with your local and regional groups so you don’t miss out on a great event!

So much information, so little time. Hope to cross paths with you at some of these!

SharePoint [Me] Filter in PowerApps

SharePoint has a couple of built-in filters for column values: [Today] and [Me]. These allow users to filter views by dynamic data. For example you can create a view called AssignedToMe and set a filter like so:


Using this approach site admins don’t need to create views specific to each user, but can use the [Me] filter on a single view that applies to each individual user. As a user visits the view, they see only the records that are specific to them.

How does one do this in PowerApps when filtering data? Good question. This came up during our Minnesota SharePoint User Group (MNSPUG) meeting today and good old Brian Caauwe knew the answer: rather than using [Me] we use the User function in PowerApps.

On a gallery or data table object, our Items property might have a formula something like this:

Items = Filter(‘IT Request’, AssignedTo.DisplayName=User().FullName)

Note: When bringing fields over from SharePoint, PowerApps translates the CreatedBy and ModifiedBy fields to something a little different. That might be a little confusing when getting started.

  • CreatedBy –> Author
  • ModifiedBy –> Editor

Good questions from the attendees today and good catch by Brian with the User() answer. Smile 


PowerApps: Rules for Conditional Formatting

Well done PowerApps team!! Just days before Ignite they rolled out Rules for Conditional Formatting in PowerApps. You could technically get the same functionality with building out formulas, but the new (experimental) rules bypass this and are MUCH more end-user friendly.


Check out the blog post.

AND take a look at the supporting documentation that’s already released:
Create a rule in PowerApps


For those of us coming from a SharePoint background this is creeping closer to functionality that was available back in the days of SharePoint Designer. As soon as a true web part is available to embed a PowerApp in a SharePoint page (hopefully the new “modern” pages) users will be able to replace SharePoint views with robust apps that include conditional formatting and other goodies not currently available in SharePoint alone. 

Exciting stuff and more to come!!

Source Parameter Still Alive in Modern Pages

SharePoint’s “modern” capabilities are changing the face of SharePoint – for the better. But it is taking us further away from some of the tricks and approaches that work with “classic” SharePoint. Thankfully one of the long-standing legacy features of SharePoint still seems to work – the Source parameter. 

When used as part of a URL in SharePoint the Source=[URL] parameter takes users to the specified page after a form is saved or cancelled. This allows us to manage some of the navigation flow for users.

So how does this work with “modern” lists and pages. On a list, you have the ‘New’ item button on the top bar.

When you click it the new item panel opens up. The top links on the panel include a ‘Copy link’ link.


‘Copy link’ for the New Item gives us the URL of the New Item form that can be used to link from other locations – such as an email footer, the left nav in a SharePoint site, etc. This link includes the Source parameter and by default will go to the default list view page for the list. Usually, that’s not where we’d like to see users end up.

If I’m building an intake solution, I might have a ‘My Requests’ page where I’d like users to end up. To make that happen it’s as easy as copying the link from the New Item page, getting the link to the My Requests page, and then swapping out the Source parameter value.

The default New Item link (with site-specific stuff stripped out):
https://[mydomain][sitename]/_layouts/15/listform.aspx?PageType=8&ListId=[listGUID]&RootFolder=&Source=[THIS IS WHAT YOU CHANGE]&ContentTypeId=[contentTypeId]

Target destination URL:

The link you’ll use:

Using this approach you have a link you can use where users will be able to submit a new request, then end up on the My IT Requests page rather than the default list view page.


SharePoint Fest – Chicago

Heading to SPFest Chicago in December? I’ll be presenting a few sessions on PowerApps.

PWR104 – PowerApps for SharePoint Users
PWR202 – From SharePoint to PowerApps: Evolution of the ‘Intake Form’ Solution
(Check out the sessions here)

There’s going to be a LOT of great speakers, sponsors, and content. Fresh out of Ignite there will be a lot to talk about.

Interested in attending? Here’s a discount code (click for registration):

Hope to see you there!!

Microsoft Ignite 2017 !!

UPDATE: They’ve managed to fix our session overlap – new location and time shown below!
UPDATE: Added links to the Tech Community Discussions for each session. Chime in! 

In a relatively late development, I’ll be attending and speaking at Ignite in Orlando this year! I wasn’t planning on either, so this is exciting. Working on both SharePoint and PowerApps, I’ve got one theater session and will be co-presenting with Cathy Dew on a full breakout session. Links and details below.

Microsoft Ignite in Orlando. Sept. 25 – 29th.

Evolution of the Intake Request Solution from SharePoint to PowerApps
OCCC South – Expo Theater #4
Wednesday @ 1:05 – 1:25
Tech Community Discussion <- Talk to us! 

w/Cathy Dew:
Create Custom forms and digital experiences in SharePoint using Microsoft PowerApps
Thursday @12:30 – 1:45
Tech Community Discussion <- Talk to us! 

Yes, if you’re looking at the times the two sessions actually overlap right now (fixed!). We’re working on that. Smile with tongue out Worst case I leave Cathy’s session a little before we’re done and RUN to the other building. Let’s hope it doesn’t come to that. Either way we’ll make it work.

SUPER excited to be able to attend and contribute. Hope to see you there!

JS Link – Add Ellipsis to a Column

Ran across a random request the other day to see the ellipsis menu added to a column other than the Title column. Turns out it’s a pretty simple change similar to how we change the column header text in a SharePoint view.

listItemMenu = “TRUE”

See the full code HERE.

Note: To remove the ellipsis from the Title column in the view, change the column from “Title (linked to item with edit menu)” to “Title” field in the view Columns.


Note and Disclaimer: JS Link currently works in SharePoint 2013, 2016, and SharePoint Online. JS Link does NOT work with the ‘Modern Experience’ interface – only Classic Mode. See ‘Choose Your Path Forward’ for more information.

JS Link – No More HTML in Calculated Field Change

Didn’t see that coming.

More than a few times I’ve had folks bring up solutions using calculated fields to do some of the same things we do with Client-side rendering (CSR) and JS Link in SharePoint. That was fine at the time. Just another way to get to the solution using creative out of the box capabilities – until now.

Microsoft implemented a change yesterday (June 13, 2017) that HTML or script elements in calculated fields would be turned off. Apparently this was an ‘undocumented use’ of the feature. The system is now escaping special characters and replacing the column with a blank in the list view.

Now What?

The short answers – in no particular order:

  1. Client-side rendering via JS Link property of web parts. This only works for Classic mode. If you are using Classic mode, this is likely the ‘best’ short term answer to broken interfaces until a longer-term solution is implemented
  2. Third party products
  3. SPFx Extensions or customization
  4. PowerApps

CSR and JS Link: There are multiple ways to implement JS Link, some via the browser (how I use JS Link) and via deployed coded solutions (Dev only). As mentioned in other responses JS Link does NOT work in the modern experience. It will only work in the Classic mode (as long as it is around). There have been NO dates announced for getting rid of Classic mode at this time. If you choose this direction it’s worth noting that if you’re comfortable writing script in the calculated field you’ll likely be comfortable writing the code needed to get CSR to work. I’ve got plenty of examples in the link included here.

Third party products. I’ve seen folks mention something called Skybow but I’ve never seen or used it. Only mentioning because it was mentioned by someone in the community I trust.

SPFx Extensions and customizations: This is the ‘approved’ development path for deployed solutions. If you are a developer and/or are creating solutions that are used across a broader scope this is likely the path you should go down.

PowerApps: This is likely the long-term replacement for solutions you used HTML or other scripting in your calculated field for (hand slap from English teacher). Embedded integration with SharePoint isn’t there yet (well, it kind of is…), but has been announced. You can start building the views/solutions you need, but they won’t be ‘really’ embedded in SharePoint yet – web parts and/or other tools are coming soon (they’ve been announced).

Note: Much of the attention to PowerApps has been in the area of forms, but views will be a part of the capabilities as well. They’ve already made improvements with introduction of controls like the Data Table control. Check out my posts on PowerApps for SharePoint users, specifically things like ‘List View’ Layouts.


Migration Note: Do not forget to take this into consideration now as something to look at when migrating from an environment where special characters (HTML and scripting) work into an environment (O365, etc.) where they do not. You’ll need a plan to replace or update your field customizations.


Unfortunately this seems like a pretty sudden change. I certainly had no idea it was coming. For folks that were using this approach there’s a lot of scrambling going on right now dealing with blank columns that weren’t blank a few days ago. Depending on how complex the scripting was, some fixes might be as easy as stripping the HTML and script out and displaying a simple value. More complex solutions are going to take some effort to redo, either with a new approach, new code, or 3rd party software to get the business functionality back.

For simple HTML replacement, JS Link could be an easy switch. If you’ve never used it before check out the Hello World post and then the KPI post. Those will cover a lot and introduce you to the JS Link concept if you need to dig deeper for more complex solutions.

Good luck!