SharePoint, PowerApps, and List View Permissions

While discussing SharePoint list views during a recent SharePoint 101 session at our local SharePoint User group, the inevitable question about permissions on columns and views came up. Standard answer: ‘No’. Permissions in SharePoint are set at the list level, or the item level. Nothing is available at the column or view level. However

Here are the facts (today – this stuff changes so fast…):

  • Permissions on SharePoint lists are set at the list or item level. There are no SharePoint settings for permissions on a specific view.
  • PowerApps are surfaced in the views dropdown.
  • PowerApps permissions are set at the App level.

Are you there yet? Did you make the connection? Yep. You can have an item in the view dropdown with permissions different than the list itself. You can now have a ‘view’ with its own permissions. PowerApps are even integrated enough to *not* show up in the dropdown if you are a user that doesn’t have permissions to the App.

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Now, PowerApps are not as simple to create as a SharePoint view, but it is possible. Currently two facts hamper users a little bit here.

  1. The current SharePoint to PowerApps ‘wizard’ only creates a phone layout App. Not something that easily replicates a traditional SharePoint view.
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    Don’t get me wrong, this template (wizard) is awesome. it just doesn’t do what we’re talking about (replicate a list view) in this scenario.
  2. PowerApps are not yet embedded in the SharePoint interface – so the user experience is not as smooth as we’d like it to be.

I have to believe that both of these issues are on the roadmap for the PowerApps and SharePoint teams. We’ll just need to wait and see if and when they work their way up the list. Smile

Until these are addressed, you have a few things you can do manually with SharePoint and PowerApps. I’m walking through some of the options and steps with this blog series (References listed below – still have more posts to come…).

As with anything you’re working on in SharePoint or PowerApps, you need to pay attention to permissions levels. Extending SharePoint with PowerApps – while awesome – adds to the details you need to pay attention to. #governance. You might run into something like this:
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You can also use the ever popular ‘security by obscurity’ approach and remove the PowerApps listing from SharePoint:
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Although, you don’t actually have to do the ‘obscurity’ approach though since we have the capability of setting appropriate permissions at both the SharePoint and PowerApps levels.

You have options to switch the visibility, permissions, and integration experience in the SharePoint list menu:
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These are a few of the configuration options. Check them out to see if the integration between SharePoint and PowerApps can meet your particular needs. If it doesn’t now, by bet would be that it will eventually… soon even.

References

Top X Things Needed To Make PowerApps Awesome for SharePoint

While chatting about PowerApps recently, someone told me that I should always know my ‘top x’ things I want fixed, added, changed, etc. I can see where that might be handy to talk about with Microsoft, with other implementers, etc. It’s a quickly changing community and product and hey, they *are* listening. For PowerApps my current focus is on how it integrates with SharePoint. With that in mind, here’s my top 2. I’ll come up with more later. These are the ones I think are *really* important. 

  1. Embedded
  2. Embedded

PowerApps has great potential and already has a running start. But it has to nail the embedded story. If the integration of SharePoint and PowerApps is going to be *really* successful and gain the love of SharePoint users it needs to be easy and seamless. That means when a user selects a PowerApp in SharePoint it’s not going to jump to another application. It needs to run within the SharePoint interface.

So why do I list ‘embedded’ twice? Not because I really, really want it (I do) – but because there are (at least) two distinct embedded use cases:

Embedded Forms

EVERYONE has been talking about forms – which is well and good. They should be talking. They should (and have) been yelling. The gap is obvious and a solution is WAY overdue. With the scheduled end of InfoPath and the rudely unscheduled end of SharePoint Designer’s (SPD) visual designer, users have been left with one of the community’s longest and most obvious gaps. Thanks to third-party offerings (K2, Nintex, etc.) and community-efforts (Stratus Forms, etc.) certain needs have been met, but there are still gaps and it’s been far too long for a Microsoft-sponsored solution for business and power users.

Note: I don’t want this coming off as an anti-Microsoft rant. That is definitely not my intent. There were plenty of reasons for the delay. What they want to do and need to do is not trivial and the standards are extremely high. The integration we’re talking about also requires collaboration (see what I did there?) between two separate, complex, and rapidly changing products and teams. The PowerApps and SharePoint teams are also in different reporting structures within Microsoft. Fortunately both teams understand how important it is to get this particular integration done. The good thing is that there are many indications that this time around they’re going to make it – and maybe even exceed your expectations.

PowerApps needs to be able to replace existing SharePoint forms – the standard New, Edit, and Display forms – as well as add additional forms to a list or library. Form editing needs to be easy and intuitive in terms of which fields are displayed, how fields are laid out and formatted. Beyond that, there are plenty of other features we’d love to see, but the ones listed here are the core. Talk to anyone that’s used InfoPath or SPD and you’ll quickly get a list of wanted features.

We have every indication that Forms and the embedded experience will be addressed. Microsoft has gone as far as announcing that PowerApps IS the replacement for InfoPath. It is important to remember however that the features are coming iteratively, little by little, but continuously. So be patient.

Embedded Views

The embedded story that folks aren’t talking about as much is for Views. SharePoint views have historically been a powerful tool for business users. And while they are powerful out of the box, power users continue to find that they’d like to extend views beyond the out of box capabilities, and extend without involving developers when they are able.

Again, power users were once able to do some limited, yet still extremely useful, view customizations with SPD, but lost that power with the deprecation of the designer view. For the last few years, some customizations were again available using Client-Side Rendering (CSR) and the JS Link property of web parts. While extremely flexible, this approach was beyond most typical business users as it crept into a grey area between out of the box and ‘real’ customization and development. The approach never gained mainstream support or adoption. Now, as O365 continues to mature and lock down features that have the capability to jeopardize platform stability, CSR and JS Link are also going away from fringe power users and exclusively back into the hands of developers (good for the platform, unfortunate for those that were using it). 

Users need a way to get the benefit of SharePoint views, specifically choosing a list of fields, the order of the fields in a grid or spreadsheet format, the filter for the list of items, and how they are sorted. Once those core features are available they’re going to want the ability to customize that view using PowerApps’ ability to change field formats, apply conditional formatting, and other rules.

PowerApps today are surfaced in O365 SharePoint Online via the view dropdown.

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Selecting one of them initiates the loading of a PowerApp, but only give the user a button to open the PowerApp – opening the client application.

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Embedding the PowerApp would (hopefully) spin up a PowerApp right in the SharePoint window – just like any other view – rather than having to launch a client application – which is a fairly jarring experience for users.

I think there’s some interest in this use-case in the community, but it’s definitely less discussed than the forms example. I’m not sure what the interest level is, but I imagine anyone that was doing CSR and JS Link work would be interested in it. We’ll just have to wait and see.

#3 – A View Template

OK. So I did think of a third item on my list.

The current SharePoint template for PowerApps starts with a SharePoint list and creates a series of three forms in PowerApps. It would be great is there was a PowerApps template that took the selection a step further – into the current views for a list (or library) – and had a default layout that looks more like a traditional SharePoint view – a table/grid layout. This feature alone would allow SharePoint users to leverage their existing investment in views straight into extending them in the PowerApps interface. 

Summary

PowerApps is a powerful addition to the suite of tools Microsoft is making available for power users – many of which are currently using SharePoint. The PowerApps team wants to see user adoption grow and has a large group of potential users in the existing SharePoint user base – and SharePoint folks are an eager bunch. We’re already intrigued by the potential PowerApps brings to the table. If Microsoft is able to smoothly embed PowerApps into SharePoint (and Teams!) pages, users will be chomping at the bit to use PowerApps (and Flow) even faster than they already are.

PowerApps – ‘List View’ Layouts For SharePoint Data (part 2)

In the last post we created a PowerApp app from scratch and connected to SharePoint list data. This post will talk about different ways of laying out the data on a PowerApps form (screen). This is EASY stuff. Hopefully you’ll think so too after seeing it.

Coming from SharePoint into PowerApps, the default method is to use the ‘Create an app’ menu item (Microsoft loves to demo this) in the SharePoint modern view that automatically creates a 3-form phone app connected to the list you started from. Yes, this is indeed awesome. However, that’s not what we want in this case – so we’re talking about a different approach. In this article we’re creating a tablet app – one that might look more like a PowerApp embedded in SharePoint (crossing our fingers here) would look. More like a traditional SharePoint view.

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So, back to the tablet app approach…

By default when adding a Gallery control and selected the Vertical Text Gallery, we get a control that included 3 fields and ended up looking like this:

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Coming from the SharePoint world, this looks like the default view for the Announcements web part or the ‘Newsletter’ view layout. While this is very useful, sometimes I’d like to see the data like we do in SharePoint, in more of a grid/table format. You could even do a hybrid of the two. Either way, it requires moving fields around a bit. Thankfully, this is super easy.

A few notes about the gallery control. You can select the entire control, a single item, or each field on the first item. All customizations to items and fields is done in a single item and will be replicated for all items. To select the item, select the round edit icon in the upper left of the control. This will allow you to resize the item within the gallery. Editing the item (rather than the whole gallery control or an individual field control) allows you to resize the item within the gallery. In our case once we’ve resized field controls and aligned them how we want them we’ll reduce the size of the item to look more like a grid. To go back to selecting the grid, select any item other than the first one.

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The plan

I’m going for something similar to an All Items view minus the Description field. That’s 4-5 fields with room for future controls – probably something to view details of an individual item or kick of a Flow, or some other interesting option (future posts).

Resizing, reassigning, and moving field controls

We start with three fields, two of which are larger fonts used as a title and subtitle. There are plenty of ways to go about getting the right fields on the page. I’m going to do the following:

  • Delete the title and subtitle fields.
  • Reduce the size of the remaining ‘description’ field
  • Change the Wrap property from ‘true’ to ‘false’. This cleans up the field a bit if there is enough text to wrap and doesn’t show up along the bottom of the field.
  • Make any other formatting changes to the field control. (before we copy it…)
  • Copy and paste the fields to get the number of fields needed
  • Move the fields around – I’m putting them in what looks like a row of fields, aligned along the top of the ‘item’ space.
  • Select the item and reduce it’s vertical space to just enough to contain the row of field controls. This compresses the items into what looks a lot more like the grid format we’re used to with a SharePoint view.
  • Reassign the data assigned to each field to match how you want your view to display
    Remember: For some field types you may need to use the Advanced tab or the formula box
  • As needed, reformat or resize the fields to make the best use of space

Now, the screen looks a bit more like this:
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Probably a good idea to add some text controls across the top as field headers. Now we have:
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Easy! Hopefully you think so too…

Thoughts

There are a lot of directions you could go from here:

  • Add some navigation to the screen in the header or footer
  • Change the column headers to more interesting controls
  • Add some conditional formatting to the fields
  • What feature would you like to see added?

The stuff we’ve done is still pretty straight-forward, but if we eventually have the option of embedded PowerApps as views in SharePoint, it would be nice (especially for less-techy folks) to have a wizard or template that can take an existing view and convert it to a PowerApp. The more features we add to a page like this, the nicer it would be to have it automated. Smile

References

SharePoint Online Public WebSites – Replace with WordPress

Before, and Now

Earlier iterations of SharePoint Online / Office365 included a public site. This was a simplified version of a site collection, a simple content management solution that produced a ‘brochure-ware’ type site. Microsoft announced that these sites would be going away and in March ‘15 new public sites could no longer be created. Existing sites could continue for the time being.

The latest information on these changes can be found here:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/3027254/information-about-changes-to-the-sharepoint-online-public-website-feature-in-office-365 

Pay particular note of the important dates listed in this article. Public sites can be extended, but will eventually be deleted.

The original public SharePoint site was intended to be a ‘brochure-ware’ type solution: Still based in SharePoint and easy to update, but really just a few static pages. As with anything in SharePoint, users figured out how to hack and pick it apart into something more. IMO something beyond what Microsoft intended. For whatever reason, public sites were officially deprecated. So, time to find an alternative.

Moving forward

Microsoft does have info for migrating to partners and hosts:
https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Migrate-your-SharePoint-Online-Public-Website-to-a-partner-website-cd0b5af5-d23f-4195-801e-145ec62604b3?ui=en-US&rs=en-US&ad=US 

For my particular needs, I’m going to replace my SharePoint public website with WordPress. I’m already using it for my blog and you can easily create static pages. The management of pages is very easy. The platform is extensively used – both as a hosted option from WordPress itself, and through many hosting providers as a service. Once WordPress is set up it’s extremely easy to update. I can also use the blog capabilities later if needed. Because of the popularity of the platform, there are also a plethora of plugins that offer additional functionality – like embedding other blogs.

WordPress Basics

I don’t want to get into too much “how do you use WordPress” as there are plenty of great resources out there. For this use case I’m going to point out details that were useful to migrate from SharePoint public website to a WordPress solution.

Setup and hosting

First, you need to find a place to host your WordPress site. The easiest is probably WordPress.com, but there are plenty of third party web hosts that are set up specifically to host sites as well. https://wordpress.org/hosting/ You can also install WordPress yourself. Or, you can host WordPress on Azure.
https://channel9.msdn.com/blogs/Azure-in-Information-Systems/How-To-Create-A-WordPress-BlogSite-on-Microsoft-Azure 

If you’ve got an existing site, you’ll likely get your site set up on a temporary address – an Azure address, a WordPress address, or something specific from your host – before configuring your actual domain name to point to it. More on that later.

Plugins

Once you’ve got the main platform installed, you can take a look at plugins. I’ve got three main plugins activated on my site: Akismet, Jetpack, Hide Title, and WPtouch.

Akismet is primarily for spam protection. If you have comments enabled, you’ll want to use Akismet to keep spam comments in line. It’ll block many automatically and flag others for review. If you’re only using the brochure-ware features – static pages – of WordPress and not using the blog, I’d just turn comments off. This also makes Akismet not needed.

Jetpack is a plugin from WordPress.com that extends features usually only available on WordPress.com hosted sites. I like to use the site statistics, but Jetpack also brings a contact form as well.

Hide Title was used to clean up the static home page by hiding the default page title. As a blog it’s nice to have the page title displayed, but as a home page you want to see the name of the blog.

WPtouch Mobile enables a mobile-friendly version of your site without having to do anything else.

Migration of content

Next, you will be bringing your content over or creating new content. In my case it had been more than long enough to review and update my content at the same time. Regardless of the status of your existing content, it’s likely best to start by inventorying pages, content, and any functionality.

Create pages and navigation links in WordPress. (plenty of info on this out there…)

By default, a WordPress site is set up for blogging. You can easily switch the configuration to look more like a non-blog site with a static home page. Follow the directions here for creating a static homepage rather than the normal blog home page.
https://codex.wordpress.org/Creating_a_Static_Front_Page

If you were using a contact form as part of that SharePoint public website, you can easily replace it with a Jetpack contact form: Create a Contact Form
https://jetpack.com/support/contact-form/ 

Be cautious of cutting and pasting content as odd HTML can be brought across. I ended up switching back and forth between the Visual editor and ‘Text’ editor (where you can see HTML) to clean up the tagging. The main issues I saw were with <div> tags causing weird spacing. Once I cleared those out things went much easier.

Themes. Depending on the theme you choose, you might end up splitting content across a few more pages. I found that the theme I used took up more space – so looked at logical ways to split text up into additional pages. I’m using ‘Twenty Sixteen’ for the moment – mostly because that’s what I have for my blog. I may change it out to get a slightly different look.

Flipping the switch

Now that the site is up and configured and content has been migrated, updated, or created – it’s time to get the domain switched from O365 to the new site.

IMPORTANT – if you’re going to continue using O365 for everything else – including email – you are ONLY switching the domain configuration for the public website, not the entire domain. This requires a little more configuration.

Network configuration is NOT my forte… but the documentation is pretty good and the support folks I spoke with were very helpful. The players here include: O365 administration, your web host, and your DNS host. I found the following to be helpful.

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Update-DNS-records-to-keep-your-website-with-your-current-hosting-provider-2c4cf347-b897-45c1-a71f-210bdc8f1061

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Add-or-edit-custom-DNS-records-in-Office-365-af00a516-dd39-4eda-af3e-1eaf686c8dc9?ui=en-US&rs=en-US&ad=US#cantedit

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Create-DNS-records-for-Office-365-at-any-DNS-hosting-provider-7B7B075D-79F9-4E37-8A9E-FB60C1D95166?ui=en-US&rs=en-US&ad=US#bkmk_add_cname

What I don’t like about these settings is needing to wait for them to propagate out through the web. Some settings will appear to be implemented immediately while others might take up to a day to kick in. Not fun for troubleshooting. Be sure to stay on top of the changes though as they can easily affect email as well.

What’s next?

Themes. There are TONS of these available. You can spend all kinds of time looking for and testing WordPress themes on your site.

With all the fun stuff coming from Microsoft along the lines of PowerApps and Flow, are there any cool scenarios that might work with the WordPress site? There IS a connector… Move content from your internal SharePoint site to WordPress? Automate emails from your contact form?

Things to look into. Smile 

Notes

Depending on the details of your public site, you might require more robust content management capabilities or custom functionality. WordPress is only one of many options available. A custom site may be a better fit as well. Having started playing with PHP, Bootstrap, and other standard web tools they could easily spin up a simple site that fits the needs of the site. ‘It depends’ extends beyond SharePoint. Winking smile 

References

PowerApps – Build a Simple List View from SharePoint Data (part 1)

PowerApps has a number of integration points with SharePoint. For starters, you can use a template create an app from SharePoint list data. Right now, the template is limited to an app targeted at the phone form factor. Cool, but not what I want in this case.

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What if you want to do the same thing from scratch?
What if you’d like to create an app that connects to SharePoint list data for a tablet? (or maybe what could be an app eventually embedded into SharePoint)

As with many things in PowerApps, it’s not too difficult (once you know what you’re doing with a little clicking around Smile ).

Build it

Open PowerApps studio. On the ‘New’ page, select the blank app with a Tablet layout. PowerApps will create a single form sized for a tablet. Let’s get building.

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Start with the content. Select the ‘Content’ menu item and ‘Data Sources’.

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In the right side property pane, select ‘Add data source’.

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I already have a connection set up to SharePoint. So I can use that connection. If you don’t already have a connection you can set one up from here. I’m selecting the SharePoint connection.

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Enter the URL of the SharePoint site:
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PowerApps will get a list of lists on the site you entered. Select the list you want – I’m using ‘Requests’ – and click ‘Connect’. 

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Now, I’ve got a data source from my SharePoint list: Requests.

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So, now what? We add a Gallery to our screen. In the menu, select ‘Insert’ and then ‘Gallery’. For this example I’m selecting a Vertical Text gallery.

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The Gallery control is then dropped on the screen. 

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Resize and move the control around to fit your needs. I’m filling up the bottom part of the screen an leaving room at the top for a header/title thing later and maybe a few navigational controls. Control size and location are easily changed later as needed. 

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Now, what’s cool here is that the gallery control has a bunch of features baked into it already. It can be tied to a data source and has additional controls baked into the gallery. This particular example has 3 fields available as shown below. The data for the default fields are kind of nonsense – we’ll fix that in a few minutes. 

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We need to start by connecting the gallery to the data source. And it’s really easy. While the gallery as a whole is selected (see above), select ‘Advanced’ in the right pane.

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Selecting the Items field, start typing the name of your data source – in this case ‘Requests’. It should show up as an option in the dropdown.

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As soon as you select the data source, the screen preview updates with actual data from the data source. When you switch back to the ‘Options’ in the right pane, you’ll find that the controls have already tied to the data source. When you select the fields, they show all the fields in your list that PowerApps can recognize.

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So, you can quickly set the initial 3 fields to data in your list. If you don’t have enough sample data – go ahead and add some. Then refresh your data source and the screen preview should also update. Now you’re off and running.

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That was a very simple run through of connecting to SharePoint data and getting it on a screen. We skipped over a LOT of details that you can dig into but will get into those at another time.

Next up: Layouts, sorting, filtering, etc…

References

JS Link in SharePoint – Choose your Path Forward

Times they are a changin’…

Microsoft continues to roll out the new ‘modern’ interfaces within the SharePoint platform. This is happening initially with SharePoint Online, but is also coming to on-premises deployments with SharePoint 2016 and Feature Packs. While this is a good thing for end-users overall, it does come with a price when it comes to customization options and JS Link. The new interface – the new approach – locks down client-side customizations and unmanaged code in a bid to increase the stability of the platform.

I should clarify that the JS Link approach I’m talking about is the one I’ve been working with and sharing the past few years: Using the JS Link web part property in the web interface and uploading JavaScript files via the browser. This is different from the JS Link approach used by ‘real’ SharePoint developers accessing JS Link via managed and deployed solutions. 

Classic Mode

The JS Link approach we’ve been using is still available through ‘Classic Mode’. Microsoft has stated that Classic Mode isn’t going away any time soon.

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This means we can continue to develop solutions and customizations using JS Link and Client Side Rendering (CSR) for the foreseeable future.

Downsides of continuing to use JS Link in Classic Mode are: While the ‘modern’ and ‘classic’ interfaces work just fine together they aren’t visually consistent – so it’s a bit of a shift switching from one to the other during day-to-day usage. There also aren’t any migration paths from JS Link solutions to PowerApps or new custom solutions.

The future for power users, however, is really in PowerApps.

PowerApps

Get on the bandwagon now. PowerApps is the future and is a tool not just for SharePoint users – though it does bring new capabilities to SharePoint with forms and mobile accessibility. Between Power BI, Flow and PowerApps, the Business Application Platforms tools are the new area for power users to work in.

Currently, the integration between SharePoint and PowerApps is just scratching the surface, but there is more to come and in all likelihood those changes are going to be coming pretty quickly. Today you can create a PowerApp from SharePoint Online lists and the app will show up in the list view dropdown. Selecting a PowerApp today launches the PowerApps interface. While it’s not live yet, Microsoft has already demoed and shown functionality (in screenshots) of PowerApps embedded right IN a SharePoint page. Once this is possible, the user experience will be dramatically better and solutions (apps) built in PowerApps will start to replace what we previously built with separate SharePoint pages, views, and forms.

With the tools available today, PowerApps can create an app from a SharePoint list – either in O365 or on-premises if using a Gateway – and will create a form-based solution. What I hope to see is an additional template/wizard type of project that looks more like a traditional SharePoint view –hopefully even based on an existing view in more of a grid-focused solution rather than forms on a mobile-device-sized screen. We’ll see what we get. 

SharePoint Framework (SPFx)

When it comes to real customizations, the grey-area we’ve been operating in with JS Link is going away. *Real* customizations are intended to go through developers using the new SharePoint Framework (SPFx). This is managed and deployed code. Where with the current JS Link approach we could have a single JavaScript file, you now need a new stack of open source tools, projects with hundreds of files totaling over 100MB, customization of just the right files, and then deliver the finished package to an IT Pro to deploy in your environment. While this is better for the stability of the platform (again, which is good…), it is now significantly out of the reach of power users.

There’s a lot of information out there about the SharePoint Framework, but it is also new. So, we’ll be seeing changes and additions to it as it gets closer to mainstream. Bottom line is if you’re a developer in the SharePoint space, you’ll want to add SPFx to your list of things to ramp up on sooner rather than later. 

Future ‘Modern’ Interface Updates (?)

Disclaimer: This is *not* real. These concepts are a figment of my imagination and wishful thinking. There has been no word from Microsoft on any new features here.

Some of the things we’ve been doing with JS Link and CSR are relatively simple things, like column/field formatting and conditional formatting. It would be really cool if some of these ‘simple’ additions could be added to the web interface so we don’t even need to do customizations or PowerApps solutions.

What I’m thinking of is updates to how the SharePoint View is defined within the web interface. Today we have the list of columns/fields available in the list. We select the fields we want displayed in the list and set the order that the fields are displayed in.

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A nice addition here would be to add formatting options for each column. Simplest would be simple HTML/text formatting. Next level of complexity would be conditional formatting. Next level up from that would be more along the lines of a calculated field, but combining HTML and field data like item ID. The first two at least seem reasonable to request. Smile Conditional formatting alone would likely meet the majority of requests by power users.

You certainly wouldn’t be able to do *all* the things we were doing with JS Link field and item overrides, but there are a few things that seem within reach if the SharePoint Team had them high enough on the priority list. 

Conclusion

So, choose your path. And yes, it (still) depends. Winking smile 

If you’re in an on-premises 2013 environment, you can continue using and building JS Link solutions. However, you’ll need to rebuild those solutions when you move to SharePoint 2016 or SharePoint Online. I haven’t tested migration from 2013 to 2016, but I suspect JS Link customizations would come forward as ‘Classic mode’ customizations.

If you’re in an on-premises 2016 environment, you can continue using JS Link solutions, but I would start looking at PowerApps here as well. Even with PowerApps living in the cloud, you have the ability to reach on-premises environments using Gateways. The integration likely won’t be quite as seamless as it will be in SharePoint Online, but Feature Packs may continue to improve this.

If you’re using SharePoint Online (O365), send your power users down the PowerApps path and your developers down the SharePoint Framework path. In the meantime, continue using JS Link and the pages in Classic Mode until you’re ready for the new stuff.

Previous Posts and References

Microsoft Teams – Release and Preview

Yesterday (Nov 2, 2016), Microsoft announced a new persistent chat app called Microsoft Teams. If you use Slack, you’ll immediately see the resemblance. However, with Teams as part of Office 365 it’s going to be pretty interesting to see how the integration with the rest of the platform brings all the other O365 products, services, and capabilities together. My first thought is that the integration piece will set Teams apart from Slack. Time will tell. 

To get started, check out a few of the Microsoft announcement blog posts and videos, then jump in. You do need an Office 365 tenant. If you don’t have one now, you can quickly sign up for a trial and you’ll see those links along the way.  

Check it out:
https://products.office.com/en-us/microsoft-teams/group-chat-software

Turn it on in your Office 365 tenant:
https://products.office.com/en-us/microsoft-teams/group-chat-software#a

  1. Log in with an Admin account
  2. Navigate to:
    Admin (waffle) –> Settings (left nav) –> Services & add-ins (left nav) –> Microsoft Teams (main window)
  3. Turn it on. Smile 

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Then, go to https://teams.microsoft.com
When I first turned it on in O365 admin, Teams didn’t show up anywhere in the interface for me. No tile on home page or in the ‘waffle’. Once I went to the teams.microsoft.com link however, logged on as I already was for O365, it recognized me and we were off and running. A few other quick notes if you’re getting started and trying to use Teams with existing Groups:

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  • The Group must be ‘Private’
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  • If you change the setting for your Group to ‘private’ it may take a little time for the change to go into effect before Teams are available for that group

Note: Remember this is in PREVIEW right now. So, things can and will change as features are enabled, functionality is flushed out, feedback is acted on, etc.

Personally, I’m excited because this fits right into a use case I’ve been in for a while – remote teaming. For 4+ years I was working with a team that was based 5 hours away, also working with other remote resources. We mostly used Skype (non-Business) for our day to day communication which mostly worked, but could have been better. While Skype took us a few steps forward with collaboration it certainly didn’t deliver the experience we would have had with Teams.

As a remote worker, this is huge. This is a wonderful way to be engaged on a team whether they sit together or not. Whether they are in the same building, or not. It’ll be even nicer once they have external users working so I don’t need to sign in on a particular domain – but can use ‘partner’ domains – similar to Skype for Business today.

As with any new product, there will be some adjustment time. Time to see if and where this product fits in your organization and culture. Time to flush out where Teams works with Skype, Yammer, any third party products your organization is using, how licensing with all your tools impacts your tech choices, etc. At the end of the day it’s a great addition to the Office 365 family of tools and services.

WHERE is it?

I turned Teams on in O365, but couldn’t find any other access to it – either on my O365 home page or the ‘waffle’ menu. No tile was showing up yet. Well, you can also go to: https://teams.microsoft.com

It starts you out in the web interface, but from here you can download the client as well.

Beyond the Basics

Bots – they’re all the rage. These are pretty cool. Microsoft already has an interface and development framework for bot creation. https://dev.botframework.com/ Teams will be another area where bots can and will surface. Smile 

A Quick Response from Slack

I thought this was an interesting post from Slack in response to Microsoft Team’s launch:
https://slackhq.com/dear-microsoft-8d20965d2849#.nac6qdcvk 

References and Links:

Microsoft Teams – the new chat-based workspace in Office 365.
#MicrosoftTeams

PowerApps: Admin Center, Environments, and Data Policies –First Look

A few new features have been added (or are in the process of being added) to PowerApps for us to review. These pieces are capabilities administrators and governance folks will be happy to see once flushed out.
(10/27) Updates! Per a webinar with the product team today. Shown below…

Admin Center

The Admin Center is available in the settings dropdown and allows you to manage both Environments and Data Policies.

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Once in the Admin Center, the view defaults to Environments.

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I created a Demo Area environment just to have another one listed for now. There’s certainly seems to be room for more controls here, so we’ll see what else gets added eventually. Smile

Note: Navigation is a bit odd right now. It appears the only way back to the PowerApps page from the Admin Center is by using the waffle control – which opens a new tab. Being able to click on ‘PowerApps’ in the top might be useful and more consistent with how SharePoint in O365 works.

Now that we have the Admin Center to launch from, let’s take a look at what’s in it.

Environments

Environments available to you are visible in the upper right in a dropdown. As an Admin I can see the default environment and a new one I created. The dropdown control will switch you between environments while working in the PowerApps interface. If you’re browsing around and it seems like apps or connections are missing you’ll need to remember which environment they belong to.

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Note: Switching environments brings you back to the Home page for that environment. I haven’t decided if I’m a fan of that or not… it might be nice to be able to stay on the Connections or Apps page and switch between environments within those pages quickly.

Environments are managed in the Admin Center (see screenshots above or below).

Note: Creating a new environment differed a little from the initial PowerApps post in that I didn’t see any controls for a Database. Update: This is addressed by latest blog post from the team. Some features are unavailable while changes are rolled out.

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Once you’ve created a new environment it shows up in the list:

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Selecting an environment drops you into the environment details page which defaults to the Security groups. This is another page that looks ripe for enhancements. We’ll see what else eventually gets built here. Will there be a need to add additional roles? What’s the reason for the additional left-ish nav control that currently only lists ‘Environment Roles’? Update: Well, more stuff. 🙂 In addition to ‘Environmental roles’, we’ll see ‘User roles’ and ‘Permission sets’ coming soon. Additional environmental roles were also mentioned… 

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Digging a level deeper we can add users to a group. As the person who created the environment I’m automatically added to the Admin group. ‘Details’ here shows the name and description of the security group – which are currently not editable.

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‘Details’ for the environment shows just that. But also nothing that appears to be editable at present.

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I’d hope to eventually see a way to edit the name of an environment, if nothing else. Also missing is a way to *delete* environments. I expect the default to be locked up, but it seems logical to be able to remove the others. Maybe name changes and deletes will be available via PowerShell or via some other method.

Data Policies

Also in the Admin Center is management of Data Policies. Data Policies allow administrators to control which data and connectors can coexist in which environments. This functionality still needs some clarification. Hopefully it’ll be cleared up as documentation is released.

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When adding or editing a policy, there are two configuration pages here: Choosing the environment – ‘Applies to’ and choosing how data groups are used within those environments – ‘Data Groups’.

Something that didn’t immediately jump out to me is the Policy Name editing, available at the top of the page.

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Note: It might be nice to add a ‘Description’ or ‘Notes’ field here as well. Otherwise folks are going to need to use longer, more descriptive policy names. Time will tell.

Choosing environment seems pretty straightforward. You’ll be able to set specific policies for each environment and/or broader rules to multiple environments at the same time.

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Note: One thing I saw that was a bit wonky was after selecting ‘Apply to ALL environments’ and saving the setting actually changed to ‘Apply to Only selected environments’ with both environments checked. So, functionally was ultimately the same – but a bit confusing from a user experience perspective.

The Data groups page is a bit more confusing. (the ‘Learn more’ link doesn’t currently work) If I interpret this correctly you are defining which connections or services are allowed by the apps in the environment.

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Note: Hopefully verbiage can be made consistent if that is the case… it might be confusing to use both ‘connections’ and ‘services’ when talking about the same thing – though it does seem pretty intuitive. I’m just getting nitpicky here…

Best Practices

At this point, TBD (To Be Determined). It’s too early to tell, but these are the kinds of controls that IT Pros and/or governance folks are pretty happy to see.

  • Use descriptive names for data policies
  • Should you create Dev, Test, Stage, Prod environments?
  • Should environments be created per team, group, department, etc.…

As it has with the unofficial SharePoint motto “It Depends”, I’m sure there will be conversations about these going forward. Smile

Notes and Feedback

First off, PowerApps is still in Preview and features are still in the process of being rolled out and refined – so nothing to gripe about. Just some findings. I happen to think PowerApps is going to be a pretty spectacular product… just to be clear. Smile

  • There doesn’t appear to be any visibility into which environment you’re in when working in the PowerApps Studios – either Windows version or web version. Update: Reported to be updated TODAY (10/27)
  • When in a non-default environment and attempting to create a new app, the new app will be created in the default environment. Again, both Windows and web version of Studio.
  • I was able to copy a sample app into a new environment. After opening it in Studio I’ve had inconsistent experience with the app staying in the new environment or being automatically moved to the default environment.
  • I still need to get a better understanding of the Data Policy functionality, but after creating a policy with SharePoint in Business data and Twitter in No Business data I was still able to create an app using both connections in it. I’m not sure where the policy is blocking at this point (more research needed).

References

PowerApps: Environments

Overview

New from Microsoft this week: PowerApps Environments.

The quick and short story is that environments will be another taxonomy-element-like container.

  • In SharePoint we have:  Site Collections –> Webs –> List and Libraries.
  • In PowerApps we’ll have:  Environments –> Apps, Flows, and Common Data Service databases.

As with site collections in SharePoint, Environments will be the containers with ‘high fences’ between them. All part of the same tenant (or ‘server farm’ in legacy SharePoint-speak). Environments will give us a convenient way to group and isolate objects – for management, permissions, and Dev/Test/Prod scenarios.

Also in the blog post comments: There is an announcement coming soon regarding GA (General availability) timeline – getting past ‘preview’ stage). Smile Woo hoo!

Roles

Environments have a few roles defined.

  • Environment Admins will operate much like tenant or server admins in that they can create environments and manage the settings and policies for them.
  • Environment Makers are somewhat analogous to Site Collection Administrators or Site Designers. They’ll be able to create new apps, connections, etc. and assign permissions to users of those apps.

PowerApps Admin Center

A new feature to PowerApps for managing environments and more. More to come on the details of this one, but I expect it’ll be a blend of what we’ve seen with other O365 Admin controls and/or similar to what we’ve seen with ‘site settings’ in SharePoint in the past. 

What’s next?

Reference

https://powerapps.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/powerapps-environments/ 

No new links available yet in the Learn section, but I expect them to be available soon…

JSLink – Filter on a Lookup Column with CSR

Lookup columns are both useful and a little odd in how they’re implemented in SharePoint list views. I wrote a bit about this in a previous post and showed one example on how to deal with Lookup column content. This post shows an alternative – and possibly more useful approach.

We’ll change the default link in the lookup field to a link that filters the current list by the lookup field value.  Yes, users can also use the filter built into the column header – this is just another way to implement it. I also think this is a bit more intuitive for users.

At the end of the day, this is just another example of custom link ‘building’ with CSR.
Sample File: CSR_LookupSelfFilter.js

Key lines:
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With ‘Theme’ being the internal name of the Lookup field that we’re filtering on. Fairly straightforward.

The full list:
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After clicking ‘Technics’:
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Now we also need to add a ‘reset’ link to the web part so that users can get back to the default view. Otherwise, they could get stuck in a dead end after selecting a filter value. There are all kinds of ways to implement this, for simplicity’s sake we just updated the title text and link. 
Before:

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After:
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Obviously you don’t *actually* have to change the text of the web part header – just the URL. Smile But again, it seems like better UX.

Hope this is useful.

References:
JS Link and CSR Page